eapis.org

https://eapis.cbp.dhs.gov

What is eAPIS?

eAPIS is the Electronic Advance Passenger Information System.

eAPIS is a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) web-based application that provides for the collection of electronic traveler manifest information for international travel both in to and out of the United States. eAPIS collects and passes electronic manifests to the Advance Passenger Information System (APIS).

What do I do with it?

The Electronic Advance Passenger Information System allows you to enter or upload passenger and crew manifests online.

The eAPIS is available here: https://eapis.cbp.dhs.gov

Is it mandatory?

Yes, electronic transmissions are now mandatory.

Beginning on May 18, 2009, all general aviation pilots conducting international flights departing from or arriving to the United States will be required to provide passenger manifest and aircraft information to the government. This information must be transmitted no later than 60 minutes prior to departure from the United States, or from a foreign location to the United States.


eAPIS Private Aircraft Newsletter July 2012 [not affiliated with this site]

Dear eAPIS user,
 
Because we have received many common questions, we at the CBP Private
Aircraft APIS Office are working to address current issues and
frequently asked questions through a newsletter format.  The
information is intended to assist private aircraft pilots in
preparing and submitting APIS manifests by addressing common
mistakes, best practices, and regulatory requirements.

In previous newsletters we have visited a broad range of topics, many
of which have been suggested by you, the eAPIS user.  With regard to
Advance Passenger Information System (APIS) manifest transmissions,
three common questions we routinely receive are:

  1)    How do I make changes to an already submitted APIS manifest?

  2)    How do I cancel an APIS manifest?

  3)    How do I comply with APIS requirements during a system outage?


The answers to these and essentially all Private Aircraft APIS
questions are rooted within Title 19 of the Code of Federal
Regulations (CFR).  Specifically, APIS requirements for private
aircraft pilots are described within 19 CFR 122.22.

1) How do I make changes to an already submitted APIS manifest?
 

Per 19 CFR 122.22, changes to an already submitted arrival manifest
are addressed by the statement, "If changes to an already transmitted
manifest are necessary, an updated and amended manifest must be
resubmitted to CBP.  Only amendments regarding flight cancellation,
expected time of arrival (ETA) or changes in arrival location, to an
already transmitted manifest may be submitted telephonically, by
radio, or through existing processes and procedures." (The answer is
the same whether you need to make a change to an arrival or a
departure manifest; the departure language is found further down in
19 CFR 122.22.)

To summarize and put the two sentences in context, if additional
travelers are added to an existing manifest, the pilot must
re-submit.  If the changes to an already submitted manifest are
limited to cancellations, arrival/departure times/dates, or
locations, the changes can be accomplished through a telephone call
(or through any other existing process) to the CBP port of entry.


2) How do I cancel an APIS manifest?

Per 19 CFR 122.22 (again), cancellations to an already submitted APIS
manifest are accomplished through a phone call (or through any other
existing process) to the CBP port of entry; "...amendments regarding
flight cancellation....may be submitted telephonically, by radio, or
through existing processes and procedures."

Pilots often complain that eAPIS or other CBP-approved submission
methods do not provide a mechanism for systematically cancelling an
already submitted manifest.  By design, APIS is a push-only system.
But again, the mechanism for notifying CBP of a flight cancellation
is simple and straight forward; call the CBP port of entry associated
with your flight.


3) How do I comply with APIS requirements during a system outage?
 

In describing the general requirement for Private Aircraft APIS, 19
CFR 122.22 describes how the private aircraft pilot is responsible
for the accuracy, correctness, timeliness, and completeness of the
submitted APIS information.  All required data pertaining to the
aircraft, and all individuals onboard the aircraft must be
transmitted to CBP by means of an electronic data interchange system
approved by CBP.

In describing what is generally required, the regulations also
describe how to handle certain situations that may arise
unexpectedly; "On a limited case-by-case basis, CBP may permit a
pilot to submit or update notice of arrival and arrival/departure
manifest information telephonically when unforeseen circumstances
preclude submission of the information via eAPIS.  Under such
circumstances, CBP will manually enter the notice of arrival and
arrival/departure manifest information provided by the pilot and the
pilot is required to wait for CBP screening and approval to depart."

This provision -- and the fact that it is specifically addressed
within regulation -- is very helpful to pilots of private aircraft who
find themselves without internet access or otherwise unable to access
CBP APIS; i.e., system outages, server failures, etc.


In summary, if you find yourself needing to change, cancel, or
manually submit an APIS manifest, look to 19 CFR 122.22 for guidance.
In each case, the answer is the same; directly call or contact the
CBP port of entry associated with your flight.  We recognize that
APIS is just one of many responsibilities placed on a private
aircraft pilot and we're working hard to make the process easier and
less burdensome.  If you have questions about CBP or APIS, please
contact us at Private.Aircraft.Support@DHS.gov. For all other non-CBP
inquiries, we recommend that you contact the FAA, the TSA, other
government agencies, and agencies of other governments directly to
determine what regulations you must follow to meet their
requirements.


We hope this information is helpful and we thank you for your
continued compliance.


Ralph D. Modisette
National APIS Account Manager
Office of Field Operations, U.S. CBP Headquarters

This page courtesy of FAR/AIM.org - A website of information for General Aviation pilots.

steve.isaacson@eapis.org   google+